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Topic: The Canadian government should cover dental costs

Thesis Statement: Dental care costs should be covered under the umbrella
of Canada’s publicly funded health care system because oral health is linked to
our overall health, the current insurance scheme widens the gap between the
rich and poor, and the dire need for universal dental coverage is rather a
major social and health care issue that has to be acted upon by the Canadian
government for the Canadians.

            If you haven’t figured out enough
reasons to take good care of your mouth, teeth and gums, the relationship
between your oral health and your overall health provides even more, because
choosing to practice a good oral hygiene equates to making an investment in
your overall health, not just for the time being, but for the future too. But
what if not just anybody can get a decent dental care without having to ponder
about the monetary aspect of it? What if every patient with a rotten tooth is
denied of a treatment because of not having funds and are left without access
to care? Will they ever get past the push and pull and oil and water
relationship of dental and general health?

At this present time, six million or roughly one-third
of Canadians do not have dental insurances making them avoid going to the
dentist and seek treatment only when it is absolutely necessary (Canadian
Health Measures Survey, 2010). This escalating number of uninsured Canadians,
half or most of them might have left their dental concerns unheard and
untreated, and could have contracted more serious illnesses. Alarming and
terrifying, isn’t it? Therefore, dental
care costs should be covered under the umbrella of Canada’s publicly funded
health care system because oral health is linked to our overall wellness, the
current insurance scheme widens the gap between the rich and poor, and the dire
need for universal dental coverage is rather a major social and health care
issue that has to be acted upon by the Canadian government for the Canadians.

Leaving almost a third of Canadians without dental
insurance represents a failure of the current system, as to those who need care
the most are unable to access it (Elizabeth McClymont, 2015). Dental insurance
coverage is a key determinant on whether to seek care or not. The exclusion of
our mouths from the rest of our body parts and not receiving the care it
requires is quite impossible to rationalize (McClymont, 2015). Dental care is
essential in the maintenance of good oral health and in the identification of
symptoms of systemic conditions that most likely are manifested through the
mouth. As striking and conspicuous as it may sound, Canada has indeed a type of
health care system wherein mouth is excepted as a part of the body. As a matter
of fact, our lips, tongues, and throats are securely covered while our teeth
and gums are left out from the privilege. The most common infectious disease in
the world are dental diseases, and the fact that many health issues can be
first diagnosed through the oral cavity validates its importance and co-relevance
to the rest of our body. Studies have linked poor oral health such as severity
of gum infection to AIDS, first stages of osteoporosis, reveal nutritional
deficiencies, immune disorders, cancer, and so on and so forth. Xerostomia or
dry mouth for an instance is often a symptom of undetected diabetes. Diabetic
patients have higher risks of gum infection caused by increased blood sugar,
thickening of blood vessels resulting to hindered healing process that is why
they are obligated to undergo pre-medication as a form of preventive measure in
order to avoid complication of diabetes management. The simple drying of the
mouth, even the reduced or heightened salivation, swelling or redness can be
one of the signs or could be a collective sign or symptom of an ailment or implication
of a poor general health condition. If all uninsured patients who are
experiencing all these dreadful discomforts are denied of the right to get
examined and treated because of the monetary value that accompanies one, what’s
left waiting for them? Death? Worsened condition? Does help always need to be
uplifted whenever it’s too late to do so? Oral health is supposed to be a
condition in which people can speak, eat and socialize without discomforts or
embarrassment. But to some extent, dental care services seem to be very finite
and delimited by the expensiveness of care costs and treatment. Thus, this suggests
that having dental insurance influences the demand for dental care.

 

 

Post Author: admin