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Inderpreet Kaur                                                                                       
                             Bambrah
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Professor Jeremy Brown

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EAC 150

3 January 2018

Topic: Courageousness of Red Riding
Hood

            Angela Carter’s “The Company of
Wolves,” departs from the Red Riding Hood story, moving away from the standard fairy-tale
structure. By breaking from this well-known pattern, Carter turns Red Riding
Hood into more grounded, more autonomous, and more rounded character than what
the original story had. The Girl, as the protagonist is known in Carter’s
version of the story, has proved herself to be stronger and braver in the
scenarios happened in the story such as, when the girl meets a wolf disguised as
a hunter, further she faced her grandmother’s murder (the wolf) and showed her courage
on going all alone to visit her grandmother.

             Carter produces a strong feminist
lead by pushing the girl through a startling transformation. The story’s protagonist
is a blond child who sets on to visit her grandmother by herself inspite of knowing
about the danger. She is the youngest and most beautiful child, her family has loved
and protected her from harsh realities of the life which makes her so fearless
to be scared. The girl is strong enough, in the fact, that she knows she won’t
be eaten when she is confronted with the wolf at the end. After she comments
on the size of the wolf’s teeth, to which the wolf replies “All the better to
eat you with” (Carter 118), rather than reacting to the wolf with

                                                                                                                                             
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fear, the girl shows courage and
confidence. Carter writes: “The girl burst out laughing; she knew she was
nobody’s meat” (118). This courageous response appears the guts Carter infuses
into character that had started from a lady who required sparing. Instead of
showing a woodsman, Carter gives the reader a Red Riding Hood that can protect
herself without a man’s assistance.

             The child is so brave that even the glare
of the devilish eyes of werewolf which she encounters on reaching her
grandmother’s home couldn’t scare her at all. Further she meets the brothers
of the werewolf, who were howling a chorus up around the cottage. Instead of
being afraid, she pities the wolves for bearing the cold outside. The girl,
shown as protagonist in Carter’s version of the story, is stronger than her
grandmother. On the way to her grandmother’s home at cold winter night, she
hears a wolf’s howl and instinctively clutches her knife which shows that she
is not only unafraid of the journey; she is afraid of nothing. She even ignores
her granny’s bones which clattered from their place under the bed and lay on
the bed fearless with the werewolf in favour of consummating her relationship with
him.

            The female character is so
fearless that she sets her journey to her granny’s home alone. She is
dressed in a red shawl which is represented as “look of blood on snow”. On her
way to home, she is introduced tom this carnivore incarnate not as a horrible
beast, but as a dashing young man who makes a bet with her. On reaching home,
she immediately senses a difference in atmosphere, but she refuses to let her
fear get the better of her. She is proved to be wiser, so she controls her fear
and plays along with the wolf. This shows her courageousness and proves that
she is not afraid of anything.

                                                                                    
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             To conclude, the girl received plenty of love
from her family which made her so fearless and she is not afraid of anything,
not even from the wolves. She knows that being afraid of something is of no
use, so she becomes more stronger and more fearless which can be represented as
heroic. Angela Carter basically excluded any male hero in the story and made
beyond any doubt Red Ridding Hood the central attention and that her strength would
be what redeems her.

 

Work Cited:

Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber, A
penguin book, 1993. Print.

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