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Incorporate sustainable surface and foul water system.
Prepare a separate written specification and justification

Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) are used to harvest and
manage rainwater close to where it falls by controlling runoff on the surface, allowing
rainwater to soak into the ground, promoting evapotranspiration and using
rainwater as a resource (Ashley et all, 2015). Different types of SuDS that can
be used are: rainwater harvesting, green roofs, infiltration systems, filter
strips and drains, swales, attenuation storage tanks etc.

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As the current project only incorporates accommodation for
one person the most suitable SuDS system would be a rainwater harvesting system.
Other systems may not be viable because of the high cost relative to the
benefits.

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems are used to collect rainwater
from roofs to be used for various purposes like flushing toilets, washing
machines, irrigations etc. The main advantages of a RWH system are: reducing
the volume of runoff from a site; delivering sustainable water demand (Ashley
et all, 2015).

There are three main types of RWH system: gravity-based
systems, pumped systems and composite systems (Ashley et all, 2015).

Storage tanks should be placed in a safe, secure location
either underground, indoors, on roofs or adjacent to buildings (depending on
the intended uses of the water). Tanks that are located underground tend to
have improved performance with respect to the control of water temperature,
reducing bacterial growth in summer and frost damage in winter. Where the tank
has to be installed close to the building, structural considerations such as
the depth of the foundations and the water tightness of the RWH unit and its
overflow provision are particularly important. The presence of underground
utilities may also constrain the location of the tank.

The primary parameters used for calculating the size of the
storage are:

? the storm rainfall depth that is to be captured – 60mm in
UK Average (SuDS Manual)

? average annual rainfall (AAR) 694 mm Met Office Derby

? daily demand for non-potable water 40l average http://www.waterwise.org.uk/pages/save-water.html
Water consumption calculator

? building occupancy – 1 person

? contributing surface area. Calculate what the roof area
will be http://source4me.co.uk/calculate_roof_area.htm

Calculations showed water tank capacity at 1 metric cube

 

References

Ashley, R., et al.,
2015. The SuDs
Manual. London: CIRIA. Available at

https://www.ihs.com Accessed 14 January
2018.

BS 8515:2009+A1:2013 Rainwater harvesting
systems. Code of practice

BS 8542:2011 Calculating domestic water
consumption in non-domestic buildings. Code of practice

BS 8595:2013 Code of practice for the
selection of water reuse systems

EA (2010) Harvesting rainwater for
domestic uses: an information guide.Incorporate sustainable surface and foul water system.
Prepare a separate written specification and justification

Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) are used to harvest and
manage rainwater close to where it falls by controlling runoff on the surface, allowing
rainwater to soak into the ground, promoting evapotranspiration and using
rainwater as a resource (Ashley et all, 2015). Different types of SuDS that can
be used are: rainwater harvesting, green roofs, infiltration systems, filter
strips and drains, swales, attenuation storage tanks etc.

As the current project only incorporates accommodation for
one person the most suitable SuDS system would be a rainwater harvesting system.
Other systems may not be viable because of the high cost relative to the
benefits.

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems are used to collect rainwater
from roofs to be used for various purposes like flushing toilets, washing
machines, irrigations etc. The main advantages of a RWH system are: reducing
the volume of runoff from a site; delivering sustainable water demand (Ashley
et all, 2015).

There are three main types of RWH system: gravity-based
systems, pumped systems and composite systems (Ashley et all, 2015).

Storage tanks should be placed in a safe, secure location
either underground, indoors, on roofs or adjacent to buildings (depending on
the intended uses of the water). Tanks that are located underground tend to
have improved performance with respect to the control of water temperature,
reducing bacterial growth in summer and frost damage in winter. Where the tank
has to be installed close to the building, structural considerations such as
the depth of the foundations and the water tightness of the RWH unit and its
overflow provision are particularly important. The presence of underground
utilities may also constrain the location of the tank.

The primary parameters used for calculating the size of the
storage are:

? the storm rainfall depth that is to be captured – 60mm in
UK Average (SuDS Manual)

? average annual rainfall (AAR) 694 mm Met Office Derby

? daily demand for non-potable water 40l average http://www.waterwise.org.uk/pages/save-water.html
Water consumption calculator

? building occupancy – 1 person

? contributing surface area. Calculate what the roof area
will be http://source4me.co.uk/calculate_roof_area.htm

Calculations showed water tank capacity at 1 metric cube

 

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